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Australia to install a black box that will record data on the Earth's climate

07 December 2021, Tuesday By M. Konwar
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A black box will appear on the Australian island of Tasmania , which will record climatic changes on planet Earth. It is intended to tell future generations and other civilizations about the causes of a global ecological catastrophe, if such happens and humanity dies. 

They plan to build the black box in Tasmania, as in the most stable region of the planet in terms of climatic features. Clemenger BBDO and researchers from the University of Tasmania are involved in this project. There is already a separate site where information on climate change will also be posted.

The construction of the black box is a monolith measuring 10x4x3 meters. As conceived by the authors, it should be so strong and hardy to outlive humanity. This will be facilitated by a strong case, and the device will be powered by solar panels. The mechanism will be connected to the network so that it can collect data from the Internet, filtering information from there regarding climate change.

Black box project. Image: www.abc.net.au

Two types of information will be recorded: actual (land and sea temperature, carbon dioxide content, extinction of living organisms, population size, etc.) and contextual (newspaper headlines, messages on social networks and key events related to the climate). All this will be stored on the drives installed inside the black box.  

The creators of the project will also allow users to connect to the device wirelessly and access information. The developers of the black box believe that data recording can affect those responsible for climate change and make them think. 

Data recording has already begun, and installation of the box is scheduled for 2022. Scientists assume that the space and resources of the structure will be enough to record information for the next 30-50 years.

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